Item from the Smart Marriages Archive, reproduced in the Divorce Statistics Collection

Excerpts from "Statistically, marriages in which wives bring in the most income are not
significantly more likely to end in divorce." By Amy Goldstein Washington Post, 2/29/2000

Some 10.5 million women earned more than their husbands in 1998

"the proportion of couples in which the woman is chief breadwinner has been
increasing so markedly that nearly 1 in 3 working wives nationwide now is
paid more than her husband, compared with less than 1 in 5 in 1980. The
trend is particularly pronounced among the most highly educated women,
nearly half of whom have incomes higher than their spouses, according to
the most recent federal data.'

... "According to Richard B. Freeman, a Harvard economist who has studied couples' earnings,
[causes] include a dramatic change in education habits (by the 1990s, US colleges
and universities were graduating one-fifth more women than men), combined
with other well-known trends: women's increasing tendency to work full
time, to divert little time away from their jobs to raise children, and
to join an array of occupations that were dominated by men a generation
ago."

"roughly 30 percent of working wives of all ages - from their 20s to their 60s - are
paid more than their husbands, according to Freeman's analysis of data
from the most recent federal population survey."

..

Statistically, marriages in which wives bring in the most income are not
significantly more likely to end in divorce. [No source for this is mentioned, but it wouldn't be surprising if one of the academics quoted in the article supplied it.]


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